The Social Studies program prepares students to become informed, responsible, active citizens in their city/town, state, nation and world. Through a sequence of courses in Grades 9 -12, students deepen their understanding of civics, economics, geography, history, and other social sciences.

Students use inquiry and discussion to learn about domestic and global issues. They learn multiple perspectives about diverse cultures around the world.

Students read, write, collaborate, and research to think like historians and form positions using various sources.

Students have the opportunity to take honors-level and college-level courses.

(3 credits required for graduation including 1 credit in Civics/American Government. A U.S. History course must be included in a student’s course sequence.)

Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12
1 credit 1 credit 1 credit 1 credit Electives
World History

Honors World History

Civics/American Government

Honors Civics/American Government*

Modern U. S. History

Honors Modern U. S.

History

U.S. History-UCONN

American Studies-UCONN

American Studies-UCONN

AP Human Geography

Contemporary Issues

Economics

Economics and Law

Economics-UCONN

Holocaust, Genocide and Human Rights

Intro. To Human Rights-UCONN

Honors Contemporary Issues

Honors Economics

Honors Economics and Law

Psychology

Social Studies Topics

Sociology

Topics in Modern U.S. History

U.S. History -UCONN

½ credit Electives available at some school locations.

World History examines our past, explains our present, and imagines our future. It’s a story about us. The course examines the questions: Where did everything come from? How did we get to where we are now? Where do humans fit in? Where are things heading?  The course uses the Big History Project online curriculum. The course is an interdisciplinary course including history, science and humanities. Students will view and analyze videos, animations and articles. Students will participate in cooperative classroom activities. Students will learn to use their intuition, make connections, and examine the authority, evidence, and logic of claims across disciplines and scales. Students will learn to engage with new ideas and information and to using evidence and original texts to construct, write, and deliver effective arguments. Throughout the year, STEM connections are made to the student’s career technical program. Students will develop critical thinking skills and perspectives to better understand the world around them. World History prepares students to take the Scholastic Achievement Test (SAT) by teaching key college and career-ready skills.

World History is an accelerated course for the motivated student who has a strong interest in social studies and is a proficient reader with strong writing and analytical skills. The course is designed to expose the student to the global thresholds that have had the most impact in shaping the modern world. As such, the course seeks to focus on developments that have had the biggest global impact. The course uses the Big History Project online curriculum. 9th graders will study how changes in human understanding of art, religion, society, geography, science and government shaped the world we live in today. Throughout the year, STEM connections are made to the student’s career technical program. Students will develop historical thinking through active inquiry and research using multiple sources. Students will analyze multiple perspectives and interpretations and will engage in informative and argumentative tasks. Honors World History prepares students to take the state assessment test by teaching key college and career-ready skills.

Civics/American Government is a required course for graduation. The focus of this course is to prepare students to participate in exercising their political responsibilities as thoughtful and informed citizens. Civics provides a basis for understanding the rights and responsibilities for being an American citizen and a framework for competent and responsible participation. Emphasis is placed on the historical development of government and political systems and the importance of the rule of law; the United States Constitution; Federal, State and local government structure; and rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Students will actively investigate local, state and national issues, read and participate in discussions, and develop informed opinions using a variety of writing forms. This course prepares students to take the state assessment test by teaching key skills throughout the curriculum.

Honors Civics/American Government is an accelerated course for the motivated student who has a strong interest in social studies and is a proficient reader and writer. Civics is a required course for graduation. The focus of this course is to prepare students to participate in exercising their political responsibilities as thoughtful and informed citizens. Civics provides a basis for understanding the rights and responsibilities for being an American citizen and a framework for competent and responsible participation. Emphasis is placed on the historical development of government and political systems and the importance of the rule of law; the United States Constitution; Federal, State and local government structure; and rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Students will actively investigate local, state and national issues, read and participate in discussions, and develop informed opinions using a variety of writing forms. This course prepares students to take the state assessment test by teaching key skills throughout the curriculum.

Modern United States History builds upon the historical foundations learned in Civics/American Government. This course focuses on the major historical periods, issues and trends in U.S. History from the 20th century to the present. Students examine historical themes such as ideals, beliefs and institutions, change and conflict, and mass media and technology in order to understand how the United States came to be the way it is. The course emphasizes the historical, political, social, cultural and economic events and developments that shaped our nation. Throughout the year, connections are made to the student’s trade and technical program. Students will develop historical thinking through active inquiry and research using multiple sources. Students will analyze multiple perspectives and interpretations and write to inform and persuade the reader.